Ways To Help American EmployeesMany, many simple ways that one person can truly make a difference. We want the American employee to stand a chance against the global forces that are working against us.

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  • For extra effectiveness, print flyers, handbills, cards, and posters on pink paper – representative of the pink slips given to millions of Americans.
  • Lead by example: look for “Made in America” labels. Try not to buy products that are imported. Use the services of companies that do not offshore their labor and that do not hire foreign guest workers.
  • Put a signature in all of your emails that indicates which chapter you belong to. For example, if you are in Nashville, your signature could say “Rescue American Jobs, Nashville” or “Rescue American Jobs, Tennessee”.
  • Ask local businesses to distribute the Rescue American Jobs blue-and-white ribbons (without the lapel pins) in a basket on their checkout counters. Be sure to provide the business with a basket or container that matches the decorum of their business.
  • Promote unity for all American workers. Instead of “Sincerely,” or “Best regards,” as your signoff onemails, change to “In solidarity,”. This originated when a group of workers were fighting againstcommunism for workers rights. We have adopted this “solidarity” because there is no better word forworkers’ unity.
  • Visit local community colleges and universities just before and just after night classes begin and end. Hand out flyers and talk to adult students. Answer questions. Tell your story.
  • Visit the campaign headquarters of election candidates in your state and district. Ask where the candidate stands on our issues. Give an educational flyer to anyone who expresses interest. Tell your story. Speak directly with the candidate if possible.
  • Do not just visit the presidential candidate offices. Visit candidates for the state legislator and especially candidates for the Senate and House of Representatives. Remember, the real power of America is within Congress – that is where our focus should be.
  • If you have a homepage or website, add a page of information about the American jobs crisis. Include a link to www.RescueAmericanJobs.org so that your visitors can learn more and get involved.
  • Write a paragraph at the top of the page describing these issues in your own words. You may even want to tell your own story. You may use articles from the Rescue American Jobs website as long as the source (Rescue American Jobs) and original link are clearly credited at both the top and bottom of the article.
  • Leave a stack of cards in designated public card displays at local businesses, shops, restaurants, and other places that allow cards to be displayed and left for other consumers.
  • Post your thoughts about these issues on web discussion boards for news outlets, job sites, community boards, industry sites, and other related websites that host web-based discussion boards. Be sure that you are posting in relevant topics and areas. Do not spam.
  • Attend political and related Meetups on meetup.com for other related topics: political parties, political candidates, talk show hosts, Laid Off, Unemployed, Jobhunters, Rock the Vote, and even industry topics. Talk to others about the American jobs crisis. Do not push the issue, but speak up when the subject comes up. Have materials ready to hand out when appropriate. Get to know others.
  • Wear a Rescue American Jobs tee shirt. Give a Rescue American Jobs tee shirt to your spouse or a friend.
  • Contact local senior groups, veteran groups, support groups, and other groups that share our view of American jobs for Americans first. Tell them about our issues. Listen to their concerns, and answer their questions.
  • Be patient, and do not get into debates. These groups nearly always share our views once they become aware of the issues, but they are rarely aware of the issues until we educate them.
  • Put a Rescue American Jobs “campaign sign” in your yard. Ask your neighbors, friends, and relatives if they would be willing to put one in their yards.
  • Write an editorial letter. Have at least two people proofread it for accuracy, grammar, and spelling. Submit it to all of your local newspapers. Then submit it to your favorite national newspapers and magazines. Send it to your favorite radio and television talk show hosts.
  • Sponsor or coordinate a weekly or monthly group support meeting for victims of American worker displacement. Try to find psychologists who are willing to donate his or her time to facilitate the group sessions.
  • Visit your elected officials. Take 2-5 supporters with you. Ask local government officials to support your efforts. Remind them that the revitalization of their community is dependent on these issues. Remind them about jobs lost in manufacturing and about small businesses that are stagnating or dying. Ask them to propose legislation that prohibits the use of local tax dollars to fund projects that use foreign labor.
  • Visit places where unemployed persons frequent for assistance: the unemployment office, public training centers, etc. Ask if you can leave a stack of cards or flyers. Hand out flyers to anyone who expresses interest. In areas where it is legal, you can even canvass the parking lot putting flyers on car windshields.
  • Call your local media. All of them: newspapers, television, and radio. Tell your story. The media is always looking for human-interest stories. If you have two or three others who also have a story to tell, offer to arrange a meeting over coffee with the reporter and a small group for interviews. Develop a friendly, professional relationship with the local media – even if your local media staff disagrees with us.
  • Share your story. The simple act of sharing your story with others can make a huge impact on someone else who needs support, hope, and motivation. It can bring awareness to people who have not witnessed these travesties on America’s workforce. Remember, people get involved for emotional reasons, and your story can spark others to act for change. You can even share your story with our supporters on the web.
  • Go door-to-door – just like election candidates. Take petitions and ask each adult resident to sign them. Many will be unaware of these issues and ask questions about the petition and the issues. This gives you an opportunity to give them an educational flyer and answer their questions. Be sure to only visit safe neighborhoods, and never go alone. Some communities are more conducive to door-to-door canvassing than others – do what makes sense in your community.
  • Attend industry association meetings. Make friends. Don’t push your agenda, but be sure to speak up when appropriate. Answer questions. Speak up whenever related subjects arise. When people ask for your contact information, hand them a Rescue American Jobs informational card that includes your contact information.
  • Get a Microsoft Word template for Rescue American Jobs cards. Make presentations to civic groups such as the Lions Club, Kiwanis Club, Civitan, Rotory Club, Jaycees, Junior League, Civics Club, and others. Tell your story. Give statistics, facts, and figures to back up your argument.
  • Focus on the human side of the issues. Be sure there is a local chapter meeting scheduled in the near future after the awareness presentation, and ask the audience to visit our website. This gives the audience a positive outlet to act for change at that critical moment when they become aware and outraged about the American jobs crisis.
  • Attend Town Hall meetings held by your elected officials. Federal and state congressional representatives hold regular town hall meetings in their districts. Call their offices to get a schedule. Bring other people who are concerned about the issues.
  • Do not sit together – intersperse yourselves throughout the audience and speak up during the question and answer session.
  • Arrange a Public Awareness Presentation at your local library or for local civic group. Most public libraries will reserve a meeting room at no charge where you can show a video and give a presentation.
  • Be sure to submit your event announcement to the local media and post flyers around town so that people know about it. Be sure to have a local chapter meeting scheduled after the event and ask the audience to visit our website. This gives the audience a positive outlet to take action at that critical moment when they become aware of the American jobs crisis.
  • Call radio talk shows. Ask questions. Make a statement. Be courteous and professional even if the host disagrees with you, but be firm on the issues and your stance. Tell your story. Personal experience goes a long way in convincing the audience, even when the host disagrees with you.
    If you live in a small town where newspaper advertising is inexpensive, consider placing an advertisement for your local chapter meeting.
  • Often small town newspapers will post your meeting information at no charge. Also, consider advertising in the local college newspaper. Ask at the local radio station if they would donate a local PSA (public service announcement) on the air.
  • Talk to people at your church about these issues. Emphasize the human side of these issues – the exploited immigrants and guest workers, the displaced American workers, the broken homes, the financially decimated, the suicides, and the depression.
  • Ask the pastor to have a special offering specifically to feed the hungry families in the community who have been affected by layoffs.
  • Attend local political meetings. Make friends. Don’t push your agenda, but be sure to speak up when appropriate. Answer questions. Speak up whenever related subjects arise. When people ask for your contact information, hand them a Rescue American Jobs informational card that includes your contact information. Get a Microsoft Word card template.
  • Put the Rescue American Jobs educational flyers up on public community bulletin boards that allow the public to post information. You can usually find these at: grocery stores, wal-mart, colleges, universities, bookstores, parks, recreational facilities, religious institutions, etc. Get an electronic copy of these materials that you can print.
  • Ask local businesses if they will let volunteers stamp messages onto the back of the envelopes used to mail statements. These envelopes can be stamped in advance and returned to the business before they need to begin stuffing envelopes. Non-controversial messages such as “We Support America’s Workers” or “Buy American Made” can be used.
  • invite local business owners to lunch to discuss partnership opportunities. By establishing a personal relationship with business owners, members can sow the seeds for future partnerships that can be mutually beneficial. Rather than simply asking for an immediate donation, members let businesses know we are interested in creating long-term relationships.
  • Many businesses have signage where they display temporary messages. Contact these businesses about including a Rescue American Jobs message for a specific time period. (Example, “No Jobs, No Recovery.” or a local message).
  • Ask businesses to display the A.W.A.R.E. “We Support the American Workforce” signage in their windows, on their front door, or on their products.
  • Look for local associations for manufacturing revitalization, guest worker program reform, economic development, or other related issues. Visit the directors of these organizations and talk to them about joint efforts for public awareness. Invite their members to your local Rescue American Jobs Meetup. Ask the association leadership if they would be willing to give a short speech or talk about the issues.
  • Make an appointment with the director of your local chamber of commerce. Talk to the director about the impact of trade policies on small businesses, manufacturing, and the local workforce. Ask for referrals to manufacturers and small businesses in the area who share our concerns or who have been adversely affected by trade policies.
  • Start an email contact list of friends and family who are interested in learning more about thisissue. When you come across articles, news, or relevant information, forward it to everyone on this list.
    Put a Rescue American Jobs bumper sticker on your car and ask your friends, family, and neighbors ifthey will also put a bumper sticker on their cars.
  • Send a Rescue American Jobs card in each bill or other correspondance that you mail to a business,colleague, friend, or family member. When you receive credit card applications or other junk mail thatincludes a prepaid return postage envelope, mail a Rescue American jobs card back to them.